Javafx on mobile first impressions

I decided to give it a go at testing javafx in an android device. My android device might be considered a low end device, it’s a nexus 4 from LG. The result can be seen below in a video. The quality of the video isn’t the best, I had to scale down the quality because the video was occupying 2GB.

My conclusion is that java/javafx runs with a very good performance in a low end android device with a pretty decent start up time. There were just 2 problems with this test, the first was with a demo which tested multi touch but didn’t run with top notch responsiveness but that might be the demos fault and not an issue with javafx itself. The second problem were dialogs: they aren’t showing up well.

The demo toke about 6 seconds to start which is more than the standard android app but not too much.

And on to the video:

ToggleSwitch control revisited

Going through JMetro I just remembered the Toggle Switch control that I have created. It reminded me that this should be in a control repository next to other controls, publicly available for anyone to grab. I think this is one of those controls that should be part of the java sdk, it’s very popular especially on touch based devices. For more information read my previous blog post on the Toggle Switch control.

I have heard more than once people saying why a new control, why not simply style the Checkbox to appear the same way as a Toggle Switch. I think Toggle Switch merits being its own control the same way the Radio Button and Checkbox aren’t just skins of the Toggle Button, besides being conceptually a different control a Checkbox has the indeterminate state which doesn’t make sense in a Toggle Switch. Toggle Switch are usually also animated which can’t be achieved by skinning. And finally creating a Toggle Switch control makes it easier for others to style the control in different ways via css (styling a Checkbox to look like a Toggle Switch is difficult and hacky) .

So I decided to submit this control to the ControlsFX project.

One of the pertinent feedbacks I’ve received from the project members was that the default skin should be inline with the Modena theme.  And so I created a new css stylesheet that I think is inline with Modena and is the default look of the control (if you don’t override the default stylesheet):

ToggleSwitch -  modena theme

ToggleSwitch – modena theme

Metro style DatePicker for Java (JMetro)

This time the DatePicker gets the jmetro treatment. Another control that is not part of the windows framework (XAML UI Framework) at least not in the form JavaFX presents it.

Here are the screen captures:

DatePicker - light theme

DatePicker – light theme 


DatePicker - dark theme

DatePicker – dark theme

As always you can get this at:

Metro style spinner for java (JMetro)

It’s been a while since I’ve worked on JMetro.

This time a control that’s not part of the windows framework: the spinner.
I opted to style the control in its STYLE_CLASS_SPLIT_ARROWS_HORIZONTAL style, that is horizontal arrows split between left and right sides. To style the control you need to add the style you want to the StyleClass observable list:


the other possible styles are:


And here are the controls in their light and dark theme:

spinner - light theme 2

Spinner – light theme

spinner - dark theme 2

Spinner – dark theme

As always you can get this at jfxtras.

Contextual Ribbon Tabs for the Ribbon

A small update to the Ribbon control: Contextual Ribbon Tabs.

Some controls should only appear when a particular object is selected because they only affect the configuration of that object. This is why Contextual Ribbon Tabs exist. They only appear when a particular object is selected and disappear when it looses its selection.

To differentiate themselves from regular Ribbon Tabs they appear with a different color, they can also be composed of more than one Tab. In the picture below the Contextual Ribbon Tab appears in blue.